Where the Girls Are

“Terrific…amazing…Where the Girls Are may be the funniest, most original, most brilliant piece of academic writing I’ve ever read.” — The Washington Post

“Smart and devilishly funny, Where the Girls Are is as much fun as driving around town in a top-down convertible.” — The Chicago Sun-Times

“A bright, mouthy, accept-no-bullshit treatment of the media’s contradictory images of women since World War II…a brave and funny book…a welcome, intelligent cultural history.” — Elle

“What a pleasure it is to find Susan Douglas…engagingly written, Where the Girls Are provides a first-rate analysis of the music, movies and TV imagery that helped shape female psyches.” — Newsweek

“A book so sincere, witty and pragmatic that it’s positively subversive…more like a smart self–help book than an academic treatise…Where the Girls Are may auger a new populism in media studies, an era when everyone will think of mass culture as something to be analyzed as well as absorbed.” — Women’s Review of Books

“Wonderfully witty…sometimes acerbic, often amusing, and always eloquent.”— Chattanooga Free Press

“A pleasure to read…an engaging book…displays a wisdom and tolerance that bespeak an understanding of complexity and ambiguity” — The Boston Globe

“Where the Girls Are is so good–so real, so true, so funny—that no review can do it justice.” — The Pilot

“Douglas is a snappy, opinionated writer…brilliant…Where the Girls Are deftly explores how the mass media has made us women what we are today–cultural schizophrenics who rebel against yet submit to the prevailing images of what a desirable woman should be…Douglas does a great job of excavating the origins of our ambivalence.” — Fresh Air, National Public Radio

“A witty and spirited tour d’horizon of the mixed signals transmitted over the last four decades to American women via radio, TV, magazines, music and movies…belongs on the same shelf as Susan Faludi’s Backlash.” — The Cleveland Plain Dealer

“Provocative…rollicking…peppy and indignant…the most original and engaging parts of “Where the Girls Are” are Ms. Douglas’s irreverent and sometimes very funny readings of specific television shows and pop songs.” — The New York Times

“Where the Girls Are is as original and refreshing a popular culture critique as anybody is producing these days.” — Ann Arbor News

“A penetrating flotilla of wit, nostalgia and revenge…Douglas delights as she dresses down the media to its sexist bone.” — Vogue

“Her finely honed wit and sense of the absurd will keep you turning the pages…After reading Susan Douglas’s media history, you’ll never regard television as an innocuous companion again.” — The Detroit News and Free Press

“Some books are just fun to read, no matter how much seriousness lurks beneath the surface…filled with pungent criticism…a well-argued piece of work.” — Colorado Springs Gazette Telegraph

“The wisecracks are choice…a bracingly acidic review of the way women have been portrayed.” — The Milwaukee Journal

“Douglas has written a delightful chronicle of mass media portrayal of women from the 1950s to the present…Douglas successfully shows the complex role the media play in our lives.” — The Trenton Times

“Douglas brings irony, insight, and more than a little humor to this new take on what the last several decades have had to say to and about women in America.” — Bibliophile

“Susan Douglas has perfectly captured the ever-present internal battles between femininty and feminism…her tone is playful but her message is serious.” — In These Times

“Highly recommended…Like machine gun fire, the history of women through this century explodes from her pen…she knows her topic thoroughly and presents it as a rapid fire lecture without drawing a breath…highly literate.” — West Coast Review of Books

“Douglas zings just about everyone in Where the Girls Are, a perceptive, irreverent and thoroughly enjoyable tour of the mass media and how it has shaped the female psyche in America.” — The Seattle Times

“An interesting, witty analysis…the book’s contribution lies in bringing the reader to new recognitions of familiar events…succeeds admirably in rescuing much of female culture from the dustbin of history…the formative media influences of our past and present will take on new meanings for those who read this intelligent and delightful book.” — The San Francisco Chronicle

“An angry, amusing pop-culture chronicle…Douglas produces vibrant notes… energetic and accurate.” — New York Magazine

“An intriguing baby-boomer Baedeker to the conflicting portrayals of women in postwar pop culture…there’s sure to be something in Girls that will bring a groan of recognition.” — People

“A wickedly funny examination of media images of women over the last 50 years.” — Entertainment Weekly

“In this thoughtful, cheeky tour of television and the rest of American pop culture, Douglas is tough yet anything but a scold as she deciphers the markedly mixed messages fed to women and girls…written with insight and good humor.” — Associated Press